Category Archives: espresso

Bean Counters and Ecologists

[So many things in my drafts, but this one should be quick.]

Recently met someone who started describing their restaurant after calling it a “café”. The “pitch” revolved around ethical practices, using local products, etc. As both a coffee geek and ethnographer, my simple question was: “Which coffee do you use?” Turns out, they’re importing coffee from a multinational corporation. “Oh, but, they’re lending us an expensive espresso machine for free! And they have fair-trade coffee!”

Luckily, we didn’t start talking about “fair trade”. And this person was willing to reflect upon the practices involved, including about the analogy with Anheuser-Busch or Coca-Cola. We didn’t get further into the deeper consequences of the resto’s actions, but the “seed” has been planted.

Sure, it’s important to focus on your financials and there’s nothing preventing a business from being both socially responsible and profitable. It just requires a shift in mindset. Small, lean, nimble businesses are more likely to do it than big, multinational corporate empires…

…which leads me to Google.

Over the years since its IPO, Google has attracted its share of praise and criticism. Like any big, multinational corporate empire. In any sector.

Within the tech sector, the Goog‘ is often compared with Microsoft, Facebook, Twitter, and Apple. All of these corporate entities have been associated in some people’s minds with some specific issue, from child labour and failure to protect users’ privacy to anticompetitive practices (the tech equivalent of free fridges and espresso machines). The issues are distinct and tech enthusiast spend a large amount of time discussing which one is worse. Meanwhile, we’re forgetting a number of larger issues.

Twitter is an interesting example, here. The service took its value from being at the centre of an ecosystem. As with any ecosystem, numerous interactions among many different members produce unexpected and often remarkable results. As the story goes, elements like hashtags and “@-replies” were invented by users and became an important part of the system. Third-party developers were instrumental in Twitter’s reach outside of its original confines. Though most of the original actors have since left the company, the ecosystem has maintained itself over the years.

When Twitter started changing the rules concerning its API, it shook the ecosystem. Sure, the ecosystem will maintain itself, in the end. But it’s nearly impossible to predict how it will change. For people at Twitter, it must have been obvious that the first changes was a warning shot to scare away those they didn’t want in their ecosystem. But, to this day, there are people who depend on Twitter, one way or another.

Google Reader offers an interesting case. The decision to kill it might have been myopic and its death might have a domino effect.

The warning shot was ambiguous, but the “writing was on the wall”. Among potential consequences of the move, the death of RSS readers was to be expected. One might also expect users of feedreaders to be displeased. In the end, the ecosystem will maintain itself.

Chances are, feedreading will be even more marginalized than it’s been and something else might replace it. Already, many people have been switching from feedreading to using Twitter as a way to gather news items.

What’s not so well-understood is the set of indirect consequences, further down the line. Again, domino effect. Some dominoes are falling in the direction of news outlets which have been slow to adapt to the ways people create and “consume” news items. Though their ad-driven models may sound similar to Google’s, and though feedreading might not be a significant source of direct revenue, the death of feedreaders may give way to the birth of new models for news production and “consumption” which might destabilize them even further. Among the things I tag as #FoJ (“Future of Journalism”) are several pieces of a big puzzle which seems misunderstood by news organizations.

There are other big dominoes which might fall from the death of Google Reader. Partly because RSS itself is part of a whole ecosystem. Dave Winer and Aaron Swartz have been major actors in the technical specifications of RSS. But Chris Lydon and people building on calendar syndication are also part of the ecosystem. In business-speak, you might call them “stakeholders”. But thinking about the ecosystem itself leads to a deeper set of thoughts, beyond the individuals involved. In the aftermath of Aaron Swartz’s premature death, it may be appropriate to point out that the ecosystem is more than the sum of its parts.

As I said on a service owned by another widely-criticized corporate empire:

Many of us keep saying that Google needs to listen to its social scientists. It also needs to understand ecology.

Judging Coffee and Beer: Answer to DoubleShot Coffee Company

DoubleShot Coffee Company: More Espresso Arguments.

I’m not in the coffee biz but I do involve myself in some coffee-related things, including barista championships (sensory judge at regional and national) and numerous discussions with coffee artisans. In other words, I’m nobody important.

In a way, I “come from” the worlds of beer and coffee homebrewing. In coffee circles, I like to introduce myself as a homeroaster and blogger.

(I’m mostly an ethnographer, meaning that I do what we call “participant-observation” as both an insider and an outsider.)

There seem to be several disconnects in today’s coffee world, despite a lot of communication across the Globe. Between the huge coffee corporations and the “specialty coffee” crowd. Between coffee growers and coffee lovers. Between professional and home baristas. Even, sometimes, between baristas from different parts of the world.
None of it is very surprising. But it’s sometimes a bit sad to hear people talk past one another.

I realize nothing I say may really help. And it may all be misinterpreted. That’s all part of the way things go and I accept that.

In the world of barista champions and the so-called “Third Wave,” emotions seem particularly high. Part of it might have to do with the fact that so many people interact on a rather regular basis. Makes for a very interesting craft, in some ways. But also for rather tense moments.

About judging…
My experience isn’t that extensive. I’ve judged at the Canadian Eastern Regional BC twice and at the Canadian BC once.
Still, I did notice a few things.

One is that there can be a lot of camaraderie/collegiality among BC participants. This can have a lot of beneficial effects on the quality of coffee served in different places as well as on the quality of the café experience itself, long after the championships. A certain cohesiveness which may come from friendly competition can do a lot for the diversity of coffee scenes.

Another thing I’ve noticed is that it’s really easy to be fair, in judging using WBC regulations. It’s subjective in a very literal way since there’s tasting involved (tastebuds belong to the “subjects” of the sensory and head judges). But it simply has very little if anything to do with personal opinions, relationships, or “liking the person.” It’s remarkably easy to judge the performance, with a focus on what’s in the cup, as opposed to the person her-/himself or her/his values.

Sure, the championship setting is in many ways artificial and arbitrary. A little bit like rules for an organized sport. Or so many other contexts.

A competition like this has fairly little to do with what is likely to happen in “The Real World” (i.e., in a café). I might even say that applying a WBC-compatible in a café is likely to become a problem in many cases. A bit like working the lunch shift at a busy diner using ideas from the Iron Chef or getting into a street fight and using strict judo rules.

A while ago, I was working in French restaurants, as a «garde-manger» (assistant-chef). We often talked about (and I did meet a few) people who were just coming out of culinary institutes. In most cases, they were quite good at producing a good dish in true French cuisine style. But the consensus was that “they didn’t know how to work.”
People fresh out of culinary school didn’t really know how to handle a chaotic kitchen, order only the supplies required, pay attention to people’s tastes, adapt to differences in prices, etc. They could put up a good show and their dishes might have been exquisite. But they could also be overwhelmed with having to serve 60 customers in a regular shift or, indeed, not know what to do during a slow night. Restaurant owners weren’t that fond of hiring them, right away. They had to be “broken out” («rodés»).

Barista championships remind me of culinary institutes, in this way. Both can be useful in terms of skills, but experience is more diverse than that.

So, yes, WBC rules are probably artificial and arbitrary. But it’s easy to be remarkably consistent in applying these rules. And that should count for something. Just not for everythin.

Sure, you may get some differences between one judge and the other. But those differences aren’t that difficult to understand and I didn’t see that they tended to have to do with “preferences,” personal issues, or anything of the sort. From what I noticed while judging, you simply don’t pay attention to the same things as when you savour coffee. And that’s fine. Cupping coffee isn’t the same thing as drinking it, either.

In my (admittedly very limited) judging experience, emphasis was put on providing useful feedback. The points matter a lot, of course, but the main thing is that the points make sense in view of the comments. In a way, it’s to ensure calibration (“you say ‘excellent’ but put a ‘3,’ which one is more accurate?”) but it’s also about the goals of the judging process. The textual comments are a way to help the barista pay attention to certain things. “Constructive criticism” is one way to put it. But it’s more than that. It’s a way to get something started.

Several of the competitors I’ve seen do come to ask judges for clarifications and many of them seemed open to discussion. A few mostly wanted justification and may have felt slighted. But I mostly noticed a rather thoughtful process of debriefing.

Having said that, there are competitors who are surprised by differences between two judges’ scores. “But both shots came from the same portafilter!” “Well, yes, but if you look at the video, you’ll notice that coffee didn’t flow the same way in both cups.” There are also those who simply doubt judges, no matter what. Wonder if they respect people who drink their espresso…

Coming from the beer world, I also notice differences with beer. In the beer world, there isn’t really an equivalent to the WBC in the sense that professional beer brewers don’t typically have competitions. But amateur homebrewers do. And it’s much stricter than the WBC in terms of certification. It requires a lot of rote memorization, difficult exams (I helped proctor two), judging points, etc.

I’ve been a vocal critic of the Beer Judge Certification Program. There seems to be an idea, there, that you can make the process completely neutral and that the knowledge necessary to judge beers is solid and well-established. One problem is that this certification program focuses too much on a series of (over a hundred) “styles” which are more of a context-specific interpretation of beer diversity than a straightforward classification of possible beers.
Also, the one thing they want to avoid the most (basing their evaluation on taste preferences) still creeps in. It’s probably no coincidence that, at certain events, beers which were winning “Best of Show” tended to be big, assertive beers instead of very subtle ones. Beer judges don’t want to be human, but they may still end up acting like ones.

At the same time, while there’s a good deal of debate over beer competition results and such, there doesn’t seem to be exactly the same kind of tension as in barista championships. Homebrewers take their results to heart and they may yell at each other over their scores. But, somehow, I see much less of a fracture, “there” than “here.” Perhaps because the stakes are very low (it’s a hobby, not a livelihood). Perhaps because beer is so different from coffee. Or maybe because there isn’t a sense of “Us vs. Them”: brewers judging a competition often enter beer in that same competition (but in a separate category from the ones they judge).
Actually, the main difference may be that beer judges can literally only judge what’s in the bottle. They don’t observe the brewers practicing their craft (this happens weeks prior), they simply judge the product. In a specific condition. In many ways, it’s very unfair. But it can help brewers understand where something went wrong.

Now, I’m not saying the WBC should become like the BJCP. For one thing, it just wouldn’t work. And there’s already a lot of investment in the current WBC format. And I’m really not saying the BJCP is better than the WBC as an inspiration, since I actually prefer the WBC-style championships. But I sense that there’s something going on in the coffee world which has more to do with interpersonal relationships and “attitudes” than with what’s in the cup.

All this time, those of us who don’t make a living through coffee but still live it with passion may be left out. And we do our own things. We may listen to coffee podcasts, witness personal conflicts between café owners, hear rants about the state of the “industry,” and visit a variety of cafés.
Yet, slowly but surely, we’re making our own way through coffee. Exploring its diversity, experimenting with different brewing methods, interacting with diverse people involved, even taking trips “to origin”…

Coffee is what unites us.

Canadian Barista Championship: 2009 Results

  1. Kyle Straw, Caffè Artigiano, Vancouver, BC (663 points)
  2. Anthony Benda, Café Myriade, Montreal, Qc (627 points)
  3. Chad Moss, Transcend Coffee, Edmonton, AB (610 points)
  4. Robert Kettner, Fernwood Coffee Roasting, Victoria, BC (601 points)
  5. Spencer Viehweger, JJ Bean Coffee Roasters, Vancouver, BC (592.5 points)
  6. Joel May, Fratello Coffee Roasters, Calgary, AB (576.5 points)

Barista’s Choice (Reggie Award)

Anthony Benda, Café Myriade, Montreal, Qc

Coffee at CBC

Went to @cbchomerun to talk about coffee. If you got here because of my short intervention, welcome!

Here are some of my coffee-related blogposts

http://enkerli.wordpress.com/2007/08/13/montreal-coffee-renaissance/
(thoughts on a new phase for Montreal’s coffee scene)
http://enkerli.wordpress.com/2008/11/21/cafe-a-la-montrealaise/ (Long,
in French)
http://enkerli.wordpress.com/2008/06/18/eastern-canadian-espresso/
(about the Eastern Regional Canadian Barista Championships, last year)
http://enkerli.wordpress.com/2008/10/27/first-myriade-session/ (when
Myriade opened)
http://enkerli.wordpress.com/2008/10/27/more-notes-on-myriade/
http://enkerli.wordpress.com/2008/11/18/cafe-myriade-linkfest/
http://enkerli.wordpress.com/2006/02/16/glocal-craftiness-coffee-beer-music/
(musings on global/local issues about coffee, beer, music)
http://enkerli.wordpress.com/2006/03/04/caffe-artjava-real-espresso-in-montreal/
(when the Third Wave first came to Mtl)
http://enkerli.wordpress.com/2009/08/25/beer-eye-for-the-coffee-guy-or-gal/
(musings on coffee-focused communities)

Also, my “mega-thread” on CoffeeGeek about Brikka and other stovetop moka pots (in my mind, ideal for homemade coffee):

http://www.coffeegeek.com/forums/coffee/machines/220503

Feel free to contact me if you want to talk coffee, espresso, cafés, geekness…

La Renaissance du café à Montréal

J’ai récemment publié un très long billet sur la scène du café à Montréal. Sans doûte à cause de sa longueur, ce billet ne semble pas avoir les effets escomptés. J’ai donc décidé de republier ce billet, section par section. Ce billet est la dernière section de ce long billet. Il consiste en une espèce de résumé de la situation actuelle de la scène montréalaise du café, avec un regard porté vers son avenir. Vous pouvez consulter l’introduction qui contient des liens aux autres sections et ainsi avoir un contexte plus large.

À mon humble avis, l’arrivée de la Troisième vague à Montréal nous permet maintenant d’explorer le café dans toute sa splendeur. En quelque sorte, c’était la pièce qui manquait au casse-tête.

Dans mon précédent billet, j’ai omis de comparer le café à l’italienne au café à la québécoise (outre l’importance de l’allongé). C’est en partie parce que les différences sont un peu difficile à expliquer. Mais disons qu’il y a une certaine diversité de saveurs, à travers la dimension «à la québécoise» de la scène montréalaise du café. Malgré certains points communs, les divers cafés de Montréalais n’ont jamais été d’une très grande homogénéité, au niveau du goût. Les ressemblances venaient surtout de l’utilisation des quelques maisons de torréfaction locales plutôt que d’une unité conceptuelle sur la façon de faire le café. D’ailleurs, j’ai souvent perçu qu’il y avait eu une baisse de diversité dans les goûts proposés par différents cafés montréalais au cours des quinze dernières années, et je considère ce processus de quasi-standardisation (qui n’a jamais été menée à terme) comme un aspect néfaste de cette période dans l’histoire du café à Montréal. Les nouveaux développements de la scène montréalaise du café me donne espoir que la diversité de cette scène grandit de nouveau après cette période de «consolidation».

D’ailleurs, c’est non sans fierté que je pense au fait que les grandes chaînes «étrangères» de cafés ont eu de la difficulté à s’implanter à Montréal. Si Montréal n’a eu sa première succursale Starbucks qu’après plusieurs autres villes nord-américaines et si Second Cup a rapidement dû fermer une de ses succursales montréalaises, c’est entre autres parce que la scène montréalaise du café était très vivante, bien avant l’arrivée des chaînes. D’ailleurs, plusieurs chaînes se sont développé localement avant de se disperser à l’extérieur de Montréal. Le résultat est qu’il y a probablement, à l’heure actuelle, autant sinon plus de succursales de chaînes de cafés à Montréal que dans n’importe autre grande ville, mais qu’une proportion significative de ces cafés est originaire de Montréal. Si l’existence de chaînes locales de cafés n’a aucune corrélation avec la qualité moyenne du café qu’on dans une région donnée (j’ai même tendance à croire qu’il y a une corrélation inverse entre le nombre de chaînes et la qualité moyenne du café), la «conception montréalaise» du café me semble révêlée par les difficultés rencontrées par les chaînes extrogènes.

En fait, une caractéristique de la scène du café à Montréal est que la diversité est liée à la diversité de la population. Non seulement la diversité linguistique, culturelle, ethnique et sociale. Mais la diversité en terme de goûts et de perspectives. La diversité humaine à Montréal évoque l’image de la «salade mixte»: un mélange harmonieux mais avec des éléments qui demeurent distincts. D’aucuns diront que c’est le propre de toute grande ville, d’être intégrée de la sorte. D’autres diront que Montréal est moins bien intégrée que telle ou telle autre grande ville. Mais le portrait que j’essaie de brosser n’est ni plus beau, ni plus original que celui d’une autre ville. Il est simplement typique.

Outre les cafés «à la québécoise», «à l’italienne» et «troisième vague» que j’ai décrits, Montréal dispose de plusieurs cafés qui sont liés à diverses communautés. Oui, je pense à des cafés liés à des communautés culturelles, comme un café guatémaltèque ou un café libanais. Mais aussi à des cafés liés à des groupes sociaux particuliers ou à des communautés religieuses. Au point de vue du goût, le café servi à ces divers endroits n’est peut-être pas si distinctif. Mais l’expérience du café prend un sens spécifique à chacun de ces endroits.

Et si j’ai parlé presqu’exclusivement de commerces liés au café, je pense beaucoup à la dimension disons «domestique» du café.

Selon moi, la population de la région montréalaise a le potentiel d’un réel engouement pour le café de qualité. Même s’ils n’ont pas toujours une connaissance très approfondie du café et même s’il consomme du café de moins bonne qualité, plusieurs Montréalais semblent très intéressés par le café. Certains d’entre eux croient connaître le café au point de ne pas vouloir en découvrir d’autres aspects. Mais les discussions sur le goût du café sont monnaie courante parmi des gens de divers milieux, ne serait-ce que dans le choix de certains cafés.

Évidemment, ces discussions ont lieu ailleurs et le café m’a souvent aidé à m’intégrer à des réseaux sociaux de villes où j’ai habité. Mais ce que je crois être assez particulier à Montréal, c’est qu’il ne semble pas y avoir une «idéologie dominante» du café. Certains amateurs de café (et certains professionnels du café) sont très dogmatiques, voire doctrinaires. Mais je ne perçois aucune  idée sur le café qui serait réellement acquise par tous. Il y a des Tim Hortons et des Starbucks à Montréal mais, contrairement à d’autres coins du continent, il ne semble pas y avoir un café qui fait consensus.

Par contre, il y a une sorte de petite oligarchie. Quelques maisons de torréfaction et de distribution du café semblent avoir une bonne part du marché. Je pense surtout à Union, Brossard et Van Houtte (qui a aussi une chaîne de café et qui était pris à une certaine époque comme exemple de succès financier). À ce que je sache, ces trois entreprises sont locales. À l’échelle globale, l’oligarchie du monde du café est constituée par Nestlé, Sara Lee, Kraft et Proctor & Gamble. J’imagine facilement que ces multinationales ont autant de succès à Montréal qu’ailleurs dans le monde mais je trouve intéressant de penser au poids relatif de quelques chaînes locales.

Parlant de chaînes locales, je crois que certaines entreprises locales peuvent avoir un rôle déterminant dans la «Renaissance du café à Montréal». Je pense surtout à Café Terra de Carlo Granito, à Café Mystique et Toi, Moi & Café de Sevan Istanboulian, à Café Rico de Sévanne Kordahi et à la coop La Maison verte à Notre-Dame-de-Grâce. Ces choix peuvent sembler par trop personnels, voire arbitraires. Mais chaque élément me semble représentatif de la scène montréalaise du café. Carlo Granito, par exemple, a participé récemment à l’émission Samedi et rien d’autre de Radio-Canada, en compagnie de Philippe Mollé (audio de 14:30 à 32:30). Sevan Istanboulian est juge certifié du World Barista Championship et distribue ses cafés à des endroits stratégiques. Sévanne Kordahi a su concentrer ses activités dans des domaines spécifiques et ses cafés sont fort appréciés par des groupes d’étudiants (entre autres grâce à un rabais étudiant). Puis j’ai appris dernièrement que La Maison verte servait du Café Femenino qui met de l’avant une des plus importantes dimensions éthiques du monde du café.

Pour revenir au «commun des mortels», l’amateur de café. Au-delà de la spécificité locale, je crois qu’une scène du café se bâtit par une dynamique entre individus, une série de «petites choses qui finissent par faire une différence». Et c’est cette dynamique qui me rend confiant.

La communauté des enthousiastes du café à Montréal est somme toute assez petite mais bien vivante. Et je me place dans les rangs de cette communauté.

Certains d’entre nous avons participé à divers événements ensemble, comme des dégustations et des séances de préparation de café. Les discussions à propos du café se multiplient, entre nous. D’ailleurs, nous nous croisons assez régulièrement, dans l’un ou l’autre des hauts lieux du café à Montréal. D’ailleurs, d’autres dimensions du monde culinaire sont représentés parmi nous, depuis la bière artisanale au végétalianisme en passant par le chocolat et le thé. Ces liens peuvent sembler évident mais c’est surtout parce que chacun d’entre nous fait partie de différents réseaux que la communauté me semble riche. En discutant ensemble, nous en venons à parler de plusieurs autres arts culinaires au-delà du café, ce qui renforce les liens entre le café et le reste du monde culinaire. En parlant de café avec nos autres amis, nous créons un effet de vague, puisque nous participons à des milieux distincts. C’est d’ailleurs une représentation assez efficace de ce que je continue d’appeler «l’effet du papillon social»: le battement de ses ailes se répercute dans divers environnements. Si la friction n’est pas trop grande, l’onde de choc provenant de notre communauté risque de se faire sentir dans l’ensemble de la scène du café à Montréal.

Pour boucler la boucle (avant d’aller me coucher), je dois souligner le fait que, depuis peu, le lieu de rencontre privilégié de notre petit groupe d’enthousiastes est le Café Myriade.

Café «troisième vague» et café «à l'italienne»

J’ai récemment publié un très long billet sur la scène du café à Montréal. Sans doûte à cause de sa longueur, ce billet ne semble pas avoir les effets escomptés. J’ai donc décidé de republier ce billet, section par section. Ce billet est la quatrième section après l’introduction et des sections sur divers types de cafés à Montréal: «à l’talienne», «à la québécoise» et «troisième vague».) Cette section est une tentative d’explication de la «Troisième vague» par contraste avec le «café à l’italienne», sans référence particulière à Montréal.

En tant que phase dans l’histoire du café, la «Troisième vague» (“Third Wave”) est basée sur une philosophie du respect, une forme d’humanisme. Sans être nécessairement alter-mondialistes, les partisans du Third Wave ont à cœur le sort de tous ceux qui œuvrent dans le domaine du café, quel que soit leur statut. Étant données les grandes inégalités entre producteurs et consommateurs de café, le sens de justice des “third wavers” est surtout tourné vers l’amélioration des conditions de travail liées à la production du café dans des régions défavorisées du Globe (la «Périphérie» de Wallerstein). C’est un peu les mêmes «bonnes intentions» qui ont permis aux «cafés équitables» de capturer l’imagination de plusieurs Européens et Nord-Américains. Mais la Troisième vague va beaucoup plus loin dans la direction du respect humain. Il ne s’agit désormais plus de fixer un prix plancher et quelques normes de travail, au sein de comités formés pour la plus grande part d’étrangers à la production du café. Il s’agit, en fait, de transformer le café en un produit culinaire sophistiqué «au même titre que le vin».

L’imaginaire du vin revient souvent dans ce contexte. On parle par exemple de «domaine» (“estate”) au même sens que pour le vin. La notion d’«origine» (par exemple dans “single origin”) correspond plus ou moins à celle de «terroir» (mais avec certaines résonances au niveau du «cépage»). Les mélanges de café, généralement conçus par les torréfacteurs, ressemblent un peu aux «assemblages» en contexte œnologique. La dégustation du café s’inspire parfois de celle du vin et le rôle du barista ressemble parfois à celui du sommelier.

Comme pour le vin, l’idée de base est de mettre en valeur les qualités intrinsèques du produit de base (le raisin ou le grain de café). Dans plusieurs cas, le café provenant d’un lot spécifique d’un domaine particulier est utilisé seul, même en espresso.

De prestigieuses ventes aux enchères (Cup of Excellence) sont organisées à chaque année pour des lots de café sélectionnés lors de compétitions nationales et certains de ces cafés obtiennent des montants extraordinaires. Ces montants étant directement versés aux propriétaires du domaine ayant cultivé ces cafés, certaines plantations de café dont certains produits ont su répondre aux exigences d’acheteurs de café obtiennent des montants élevés pour une part de leur production et leurs statuts ressemblent de plus en plus à celui de grands vignobles.

Au-delà de ces enchères annuelles, les partisans de la troisième vague tiennent à raccourcir la chaîne qui va de la production des grains de café à la dégustation du café. Ainsi, plusieurs torréfacteurs (y compris certains dont le café n’est pas distribué à large échelle) entretiennent des rapports directs avec les producteurs de café. Le voyage vers une région où le café est cultivé (“trip to origin”) est presque considéré comme un rite de passage, par les Third Wavers. Un peu comme dans les produits maraîchers et de boucherie, la ferme à l’origine de chaque produit d’alimentation peut être retracée avec précision. L’idée du rapport humain est donc mise de l’avant.

Chaque café de la troisième vague est donc tourné vers la compréhension du café. Même dans des chaînes de cafés assez étendues, cette notion de comprendre le café dans son moindre détail est transmis à chaque employé. Puisque plusieurs employés de cafés sont de jeunes étudiants et qu’il y a beaucoup de roulement dans ce milieu, le «message» est transmis à de nombreuses personnes et la troisième vague déferle dans diverses villes.

Dans une certaine mesure, il y a une «façon troisième vague» de faire le café. Pas qu’il s’agisse d’une méthode vraiment standardisée, mais il y a divers facteurs dans l’art du café qui sont influencés par la Troisième vague, surtout dans le cas de l’espresso.

Le facteur le plus évident: la fraîcheur. Si la fraîcheur a une grande valeur pour presque tout style de café, elle est devenue une véritable obsession au sein de la Troisième vague. Et ce, à presque toutes les étapes. Une fois séchés et triés, les grains de café vert se conservent assez longtemps. Après avoir été torréfiés, par contre, les grains de café ne conservent leurs arômes que s’ils ne sont pas attaqués par l’oxygène. Au cours des sept à dix premiers jours après la torréfaction, du gaz carbonique s’échappe des grains de café, empêchant l’oxygène de pénétrer dans les grains. Après quelques jours, les grains de café cessent d’expulser du gaz carbonique et deviennent extrêmement sensibles à l’oxydation. Les opinions divergent et les estimés varient mais, selon certains partisans de la troisième vague, la majorité des arômes de certains cafés semble disparaître en dix jours après la torréfaction (malheureusement, je n’arrive pas à trouver de référence à ce sujet mais cette notion est souvent discutée). Selon certains, aucune méthode de stockage ne réussit réellement à conserver la fraîcheur du café au-delà de quelques jours. Les torréfacteurs de la troisième vague indiquent donc la date de torréfaction sur leurs paquets de café et s’assurent que leurs cafés sont distribués très rapidement. Les torréfacteurs italiens, eux, peuvent entreposer leurs grains torréfiés pendant des semaines voire des mois avant qu’ils soient utilisés pour préparer du café.

Une fois moulu, le café se dégrade beaucoup plus rapidement que sous forme de grains. Une notion assez commune dans le milieu Third Wave est qu’il ne suffit que de quelques minutes pour que certains cafés perdent leurs arômes les plus fins. La méthode de préparation du café est donc basé sur la «mouture à la minute». Pour l’espresso, la quantité de café nécessaire à préparer deux cafés (en une seule fois, avec un bec double) est la quantité maximum de café qui peut être moulue à la fois. Le contraste avec les baristas italiens est frappant puisque ceux-ci préfèrent moudre une grande quantité de café, les doseurs de leurs moulins étant conçus pour distribuer environ 7 g de café moulu par compartiment lorsque tous les compartiments sont pleins. (J’ignore combien de compartiments ces doseurs comportent mais le simple fait que le café soit moulu à l’avance semble une hérésie pour les partisans de la troisième vague.)

L’arôme du café comporte de nombreux composés volatils et, surtout dans le cas de l’espresso, ces composés se dissipent très rapidement à l’air libre. Après avoir été «tiré», un espresso troisième vague doit donc être servi très rapidement. Aussi extrême que cela puisse paraître, un délai d’une minute peut faire une différence significative dans le cas de certains cafés. Les arômes les plus éphémères du café sont souvent ceux qui procurent une expérience plus intense et c’est parfois la sensation procurée par ces arômes qui fait du café troisième vague un objet d’admiration. Les autres méthodes de préparation du café sont généralement moins sensibles à l’effet du temps. Un «café piston» (fait avec une cafetière piston), par exemple, évolue pendant qu’il se refroidit et certains arômes ne se dégagent qu’après quelques minutes. Mais si toute méthode de préparation du café peut être utilisée par des partisans de la troisième vague, c’est l’espresso qui constitue, selon les third wavers, l’apogée du café.

L’espresso à l’italienne est servi et consommé assez rapidement. Mais les arômes qui s’en dégagent sont généralement plus durables que pour l’«ultime espresso troisième vague». En fait, l’espresso à l’italienne tire plusieurs de ses arômes de la torréfaction: rôti, chocolat, noix, grillé, fruits secs… Le café de la troisième vague possède souvent des arômes qui proviennent plus directement de la variété de grains de café: épices, bleuet, agrume, tomate, fraise, cerise, abricot…

Tous ces points de comparaison entre la troisième vague et le café à l’italienne sont liés au passage du temps. Il y a d’autres distinctions. Par exemple, l’espresso à l’italienne comporte souvent une certaine proportions de grains venant de l’espèce Coffea canephora de caféier: le «café robusta». Les cafés de cet arbuste sont très généralement considérés comme de bien moindre qualité que ceux du Coffea arabica (le «café arabica»). Le robusta, peu coûteux, est le café de la consommation de base, à l’échelle globale, et non celui de la dégustation respectueuse. Les torréfacteurs italiens utilisent un peu de robusta dans leurs mélanges, à la fois pour le maintien de la crema (l’émulsion au-dessus de l’espresso) que par goût pour une certaine amertume durable. Au cours de la Troisième vague, le statut du robusta a changé quelque peu mais la plupart des torréfacteurs se réclamant de ce mouvement parlent du robusta d’une façon assez négative. Outre les caractéristiques gustatives du café produit avec une proportion de grains robusta, la méthode habituelle de culture du Coffea canephora (procédés industriels, mauvaises conditions de travail, manque de contrôles de qualité…) va à l’encontre de l’esprit Third Wave. S’il existe des «bons robustas», cultivés avec autant de soin que pour l’arabica, les torréfacteurs de la Troisième vague ne tiennent pas à les connaître.

À cause des caractéristiques propres au café utilisé, l’espresso de troisième vague nécessite généralement un contrôle très précis de la température. Alors que les mélanges à espresso italien tolèrent des larges écarts de température sans changer trop de goût, certains cafés d’origine unique utilisé pour l’espresso troisième vague a un goût très différent s’il est réalisé à moins d’un demi-degré Celsius de sa température optimale. D’ailleurs, la Troisième vague est aussi une tendance à l’utilisation d’outils très précis et à une passion pour l’exactitude. En ce sens, la Troisième vague fait beaucoup penser à la culture geek qui, elle aussi, prend sa source dans une certaine portion de la Côte Ouest.

Autre aspect important de la préparation du café troisième vague, c’est un jeu très particulier sur la mouture et le dosage du café. En fait, beaucoup de baristas de la Troisième vague ont tendance à «surdoser» (“updose”) leurs portafiltres d’une proportion bien plus grande de café que ce que voudrait une norme italienne. La technique de dispersion du café moulu dans le portafiltre et l’«écrasement» (“tamping”) de ce café moulu à l’aide d’un instrument dédié (le “tamper”) font l’objet de multiples discussions et d’un apprentissage approfondi. A contrario, certains baristas italiens n’«écrasent» pas le café moulu dans le portafiltre.

Comme l’espresso italien est généralement doté d’une certaine amertume, l’ajout d’un peu de sucre à un espresso italien est relativement commun. Il existe des Italiens (et d’autres amateurs de café) qui voient d’un assez mauvais œil l’ajout de sucre dans l’espresso, mais le goût de l’espresso à l’italienne est souvent réhaussé par quelques grains de sucre. Sans être anti-sucre, la troisième vague est orientée tout entière vers «le café en soi». Un café doit, selon eux, pouvoir «parler de lui-même». Comme avec de nombreux thés de qualité, l’ajout de sucre à un café Third Wave (peu importe la méthode de préparation!) diminue certaines saveurs plutôt que de rehausser le goût du breuvage.

Bien entendu, la Troisième vague permet la préparation de breuvages à base de lait (“milk-based”) comme le Latte macchiato, le cappuccino et le caffè latte. D’ailleurs, l’ajout du lait à ces breuvages est souvent effectué sous forme de «dessins» basés sur le contraste entre la crema de l’espresso et le lait. Pour certains, ces dessins (le “latte art”) est même un facteur important permettant de reconnaître les baristas de la Troisième vague puisque, pour être réussis, ces dessins nécessitent un soin particulier, entre autre dans la créaction d’un lait «soyeux», plein de microbulles. Par contre, la tendance troisième vague est de diminuer le plus possible la proportion de lait dans ces breuvages. Dans ce contexte, la qualité d’un espresso est souvent perçue comme supérieure à celle d’un macchiato qui est perçue comme supérieure à celle du cappuccino. Le latte, bien que devenu très populaire, est parfois considéré comme un mal nécessaire et plusieurs baristas se gaussent des chaînes de cafés qui ont fait du latte un breuvage avec une très grande quantité de lait. En compétition de barista, un critère déterminant pour l’évaluation d’un cappuccino est que la saveur de l’espresso ne soit pas masquée, renforçant encore l’idée troisième vague de mettre le café à l’honneur. Il est commun, dans la Troisième vague, de parler de grains de café (mélange ou «origine unique») qui ne conviennent pas dans les breuvages avec lait. En général, le café à l’italienne s’agrémente très facilement de lait et, dans certains cas, ne prend son sens que dans un breuvage à base de lait.

J’ai mentionné plus haut une distinction entre arômes de torréfaction et arômes de variété. En général, plus plus le degré de torréfaction est élevé (plus les grains sont foncés), plus les arômes «variétaux» disparaissent, surtout en fonction de la pyrolise. Les cafés italiens sont en général d’une torréfaction très foncée et, dans certains cas, les arômes provenant de la variété de café disparaissent complètement. En général, le café troisième vague est donc plus complexe que le café à l’italienne du point de vue olfactif à cause de la torréfaction elle-même. Certains torréfacteurs de la Troisième vague sont même tellement obsédés par les torréfactions «légères» (plus pâles) que certains de leurs cafés ont des saveurs que plusieurs trouvent déplaisantes. Mais, en général, le café troisième vague est conçu pour être balancé, complexe et «propre».

C’est d’ailleurs une caractéristique fondamentale de l’esthétique Third Wave qui est présente dans les règles des championnats de baristas. Le goût de l’espresso doit être «balancé» en ce sens qu’aucun des trois goûts fondamentaux du café (sucré, amertume, acidité/”brightness”) ne peut être dominant mais qu’il doit y avoir une dynamique entre au moins deux de ces trois goûts. C’est un peu difficile à expliquer mais très facile à percevoir. Et un espresso extraordinairement bien balancé est une véritable œuvre d’art.

Café à la québécoise

J’ai récemment publié un très long billet sur la scène du café à Montréal. Sans doûte à cause de sa longueur, ce billet ne semble pas avoir les effets escomptés. J’ai donc décidé de republier ce billet, section par section. Ce billet est la troisième section après l’introduction et une section sur les cafés italiens de Montréal. Cette section se concentre sur une certaine spécificité québécoise de la scène montréalaise du café.

La scène du café à Montréal comporte plusieurs autres institutions qui ne correspondent pas vraiment à l’image du café italien. Certains de ces endroits peuvent même servir de base à la «Renaissance du café à Montréal».

Dans l’ensemble, je dirais que ces cafés sont typiquement québécois. Pas que ces cafés soient vraiment exclusifs au Québec mais il y a quelque-chose de reconnaissable dans ces cafés qui me fait penser au goût québécois pour le café.

Comme les intellos de Montréal ont longtemps eu tendance à s’identifier à la France, certains de ces cafés ont une tendance française, voire parisienne. Pas qu’on y sert des larges bols de “café au lait” (à base de café filtre) accompagnés de pain sec. Mais le breuvage de base ressemble plus au café français qu’au café italien.

D’après moi, la référence à la France a eu beaucoup d’influence sur la perception des cafés montréalais par des gens de l’extérieur. Pour une large part, cette référence était plutôt une question d’ambiance qu’une question de caractéristiques gustatives et olfactives précises. Dans un café montréalais, des Nord-Américains ayant passé du temps en France pouvaient se «rappeler l’Europe». La Rive-Gauche à l’Ouest de l’Atlantique.

Pour revenir au mode «mémoires», je pense tout d’abord à la Brûlerie Saint-Denis comme institution montréalaise de ce type. Vers la fin de mon adolescence, c’est par l’entremise de la compagne de mon frère (qui y travaillait) que j’ai connu la Brûlerie. À l’époque, il s’agissait d’un café isolé (au cœur du Plateau, qui n’était pas encore si «chromé») et non d’une chaîne avec des succursales dispersées. Ce dont je me rappelle est assez représentatif d’une certaine spécificité québécoise: un «allongé» de qualité.

L’allongé (ou «espresso allongé») n’est pas exclusif au Québec mais c’est peut-être le breuvage le plus représentatif d’un goût québécois pour le café.

En Amérique du Nord, hors du Québec, l’allongé a généralement mauvaise réputation. Selon plusieurs, il s’agit d’une surextraction de l’espresso. Avec la même quantité de café moulu que pour un espresso à l’italienne d’une once, on produit un café de deux onces ou plus en laissant l’eau passer dans le café. «Toute chose étant égale par ailleurs», une telle surextraction amène dans la tasse des goûts considérés peu agréables, comme une trop grande amertume, voire de l’astringence. En même temps, la quantité de liquide dans la tasse implique une dillution extrême et on s’attend à un café «aqueux», peu goûteux.

Pourtant, je me rappelle de multiples allongés, presque tous dégustés au Québec, qui étaient savoureux sans être astringents. Selon toute logique, ce doit être parce que la mouture du café et le mélange de grains de café ont été adaptés à la réalisation d’un allongé de qualité. Ce qui implique certaines choses pour l’«espresso serré» (ou «espresso court», donc non-allongé) s’il est réalisé avec la même mouture et le même mélange. Même à Montréal, il est rare d’avoir dans le même café un excellent espresso court et un excellent allongé.

Mais parmi les Montréalais amateurs de café, l’allongé «a la cote» et les cafés montréalais typiques font généralement un bon allongé.

Selon mon souvenir, l’allongé de la Brûlerie Saint-Denis était de qualité. J’ai eu de moins bonnes expériences à la Brûlerie depuis que l’entreprise a ouvert d’autres succursales, mais c’est peut-être un hasard.

Une autre institution de la scène montréalaise du café, situé sur le Plateau comme la Brûlerie Saint-Denis à l’origine, c’est le café Aux Deux Marie. Le Deux Marie aujourd’hui ressemble beaucoup à mon souvenir de la Brûlerie Saint-Denis. Comme à la Brûlerie, j’y ai bu des allongés de qualité. C’est au Deux Marie que j’ai découvert certains «breuvages de spécialité» (“specialty drinks”, comme les appelle le World Barista Championship). Ces breuvages, à base d’espresso, contiennent des fruits, des épices, du chocolat et d’autres ingrédients. Si je me rappelle bien, la Brûlerie fait le même genre de breuvage mais je ne me rappelle pas en avoir remarqué, il y a une vingtaine d’années.

Il y a plusieurs autres «cafés à la québécoise». Dans les institutions connues, il y a La Petite Ardoise (tout près d’Outremont, sur Laurier). C’est d’ailleurs mon premier lieu de travail puisque j’y ai été plongeur, à la fin du secondaire (1988-9). C’est un «café bistro terrasse» assez typique de la scène culinaire montréalaise. Le cappuccino et l’allongé étaient très populaires (si je me rappelle bien, on les appelait «capp» et «all», respectivement). Et je me rappelle distinctement d’une cliente d’un autre café s’enquérir de la présence du «mélange de la Petite Ardoise». Honnêtement, je n’ai aucune idée sur ce que ce mélange comprenait ni sur la maison de torréfaction qui le produisait. Ma mémoire olfactive conserve la trace du «café de la Petite», surtout que le café était la seule chose que je pouvais consommer gratuitement quand j’y travaillais. La dernière fois que j’ai bu un café à La Petite Ardoise, il a titillé ma mémoire gustative mais je crois quand même qu’il a beaucoup changé, au cours des vingt dernières années.

Une autre institution typique, le Santropol (qui est aussi connu pour ses sandwiches et tisanes). Il y a quelques années, le Santropol a commencé à torréfier du café à large échelle et leurs cafés sont désormais disponibles dans les épiceries. Mon souvenir du café au Santropol se mêle à l’image du restaurant lui-même mais je crois me rappeler qu’il était assez représentatif du café à la québécoise.

Il y a plusieurs autres endroit que j’aurais tendance à mettre dans la catégorie «café à la québécoise», depuis La Petite Patrie jusqu’à Westmount, en passant par Villeray et Saint-Henri. Mais l’idée de base est surtout de décrire un type d’endroit. Il y a une question d’ambiance qui entre en ligne de compte mais, du côté du goût du café, la qualité de l’allongé est probablement le facteur le plus déterminant.

Ce qui surprend les plus les amateurs de café (surtout ceux qui ne sont pas nés à Montréal), c’est de savoir que j’ai dégusté des allongés de qualité dans un café de la chaîne Café Dépôt. Pour être honnête, j’étais moi-même surpris, la première fois. En général, les chaînes ont énormément de difficulté à faire du café de très haute qualité, surtout si on considère la nécessité de fournir toutes les succursales avec le même café. Mais je suis retourné à la même succursale de Café Dépôt et, à plusieurs reprises, j’ai pu boire un allongé qui correspond à mes goûts. D’ailleurs, j’aurais dit la même chose de certains cafés dégustés à une succursale de la chaîne Van Houtte. Mais c’était il y a plus de dix ans et Van Houtte semble avoir beaucoup changé depuis.