Tag Archives: Rousseau

Academics and Their Publics

Misunderstood by Raffi Asdourian
Misunderstood by Raffi Asdourian

Academics are misunderstood.

Almost by definition.

Pretty much any academic eventually feels that s/he is misunderstood. Misunderstandings about some core notions in about any academic field are involved in some of the most common pet peeves among academics.

In other words, there’s nothing as transdisciplinary as misunderstanding.

It can happen in the close proximity of a given department (“colleagues in my department misunderstand my work”). It can happen through disciplinary boundaries (“people in that field have always misunderstood our field”). And, it can happen generally: “Nobody gets us.”

It’s not paranoia and it’s probably not self-victimization. But there almost seems to be a form of “onedownmanship” at stake with academics from different disciplines claiming that they’re more misunderstood than others. In fact, I personally get the feeling that ethnographers are more among the most misunderstood people around, but even short discussions with friends in other fields (including mathematics) have helped me get the idea that, basically, we’re all misunderstood at the same “level” but there are variations in the ways we’re misunderstood. For instance, anthropologists in general are mistaken for what they aren’t based on partial understanding by the general population.

An example from my own experience, related to my decision to call myself an “informal ethnographer.” When you tell people you’re an anthropologist, they form an image in their minds which is very likely to be inaccurate. But they do typically have an image in their minds. On the other hand, very few people have any idea about what “ethnography” means, so they’re less likely to form an opinion of what you do from prior knowledge. They may puzzle over the term and try to take a guess as to what “ethnographer” might mean but, in my experience, calling myself an “ethnographer” has been a more efficient way to be understood than calling myself an “anthropologist.”

This may all sound like nitpicking but, from the inside, it’s quite impactful. Linguists are frequently asked about the number of languages they speak. Mathematicians are taken to be number freaks. Psychologists are perceived through the filters of “pop psych.” There are many stereotypes associated with engineers. Etc.

These misunderstandings have an impact on anyone’s work. Not only can it be demoralizing and can it impact one’s sense of self-worth, but it can influence funding decisions as well as the use of research results. These misunderstandings can underminine learning across disciplines. In survey courses, basic misunderstandings can make things very difficult for everyone. At a rather basic level, academics fight misunderstandings more than they fight ignorance.

The  main reason I’m discussing this is that I’ve been given several occasions to think about the interface between the Ivory Tower and the rest of the world. It’s been a major theme in my blogposts about intellectuals, especially the ones in French. Two years ago, for instance, I wrote a post in French about popularizers. A bit more recently, I’ve been blogging about specific instances of misunderstandings associated with popularizers, including Malcolm Gladwell’s approach to expertise. Last year, I did a podcast episode about ethnography and the Ivory Tower. And, just within the past few weeks, I’ve been reading a few things which all seem to me to connect with this same issue: common misunderstandings about academic work. The connections are my own, and may not be so obvious to anyone else. But they’re part of my motivations to blog about this important issue.

In no particular order:

But, of course, I think about many other things. Including (again, in no particular order):

One discussion I remember, which seems to fit, included comments about Germaine Dieterlen by a friend who also did research in West Africa. Can’t remember the specifics but the gist of my friend’s comment was that “you get to respect work by the likes of Germaine Dieterlen once you start doing field research in the region.” In my academic background, appreciation of Germaine Dieterlen’s may not be unconditional, but it doesn’t necessarily rely on extensive work in the field. In other words, while some parts of Dieterlen’s work may be controversial and it’s extremely likely that she “got a lot of things wrong,” her work seems to be taken seriously by several French-speaking africanists I’ve met. And not only do I respect everyone but I would likely praise someone who was able to work in the field for so long. She’s not my heroine (I don’t really have heroes) or my role-model, but it wouldn’t have occurred to me that respect for her wasn’t widespread. If it had seemed that Dieterlen’s work had been misunderstood, my reflex would possibly have been to rehabilitate her.

In fact, there’s  a strong academic tradition of rehabilitating deceased scholars. The first example which comes to mind is a series of articles (PDF, in French) and book chapters by UWO linguistic anthropologist Regna Darnell.about “Benjamin Lee Whorf as a key figure in linguistic anthropology.” Of course, saying that these texts by Darnell constitute a rehabilitation of Whorf reveals a type of evaluation of her work. But that evaluation comes from a third person, not from me. The likely reason for this case coming up to my mind is that the so-called “Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis” is among the most misunderstood notions from linguistic anthropology. Moreover, both Whorf and Sapir are frequently misunderstood, which can make matters difficulty for many linguistic anthropologists talking with people outside the discipline.

The opposite process is also common: the “slaughtering” of “sacred cows.” (First heard about sacred cows through an article by ethnomusicologist Marcia Herndon.) In some significant ways, any scholar (alive or not) can be the object of not only critiques and criticisms but a kind of off-handed dismissal. Though this often happens within an academic context, the effects are especially lasting outside of academia. In other words, any scholar’s name is likely to be “sullied,” at one point or another. Typically, there seems to be a correlation between the popularity of a scholar and the likelihood of her/his reputation being significantly tarnished at some point in time. While there may still be people who treat Darwin, Freud, Nietzsche, Socrates, Einstein, or Rousseau as near divinities, there are people who will avoid any discussion about anything they’ve done or said. One way to put it is that they’re all misunderstood. Another way to put it is that their main insights have seeped through “common knowledge” but that their individual reputations have decreased.

Perhaps the most difficult case to discuss is that of Marx (Karl, not Harpo). Textbooks in introductory sociology typically have him as a key figure in the discipline and it seems clear that his insight on social issues was fundamental in social sciences. But, outside of some key academic contexts, his name is associated with a large series of social events about which people tend to have rather negative reactions. Even more so than for Paul de Man or  Martin Heidegger, Marx’s work is entangled in public opinion about his ideas. Haven’t checked for examples but I’m quite sure that Marx’s work is banned in a number of academic contexts. However, even some of Marx’s most ardent opponents are likely to agree with several aspects of Marx’s work and it’s sometimes funny how Marxian some anti-Marxists may be.

But I digress…

Typically, the “slaughtering of sacred cows” relates to disciplinary boundaries instead of social ones. At least, there’s a significant difference between your discipline’s own “sacred cows” and what you perceive another discipline’s “sacred cows” to be. Within a discipline, the process of dismissing a prior scholar’s work is almost œdipean (speaking of Freud). But dismissal of another discipline’s key figures is tantamount to a rejection of that other discipline. It’s one thing for a physicist to show that Newton was an alchemist. It’d be another thing entirely for a social scientist to deconstruct James Watson’s comments about race or for a theologian to argue with Darwin. Though discussions may have to do with individuals, the effects of the latter can widen gaps between scholarly disciplines.

And speaking of disciplinarity, there’s a whole set of issues having to do with discussions “outside of someone’s area of expertise.” On one side, comments made by academics about issues outside of their individual areas of expertise can be very tricky and can occasionally contribute to core misunderstandings. The fear of “talking through one’s hat” is quite significant, in no small part because a scholar’s prestige and esteem may greatly decrease as a result of some blatantly inaccurate statements (although some award-winning scholars seem not to be overly impacted by such issues).

On the other side, scholars who have to impart expert knowledge to people outside of their discipline  often have to “water down” or “boil down” their ideas and, in effect, oversimplifying these issues and concepts. Partly because of status (prestige and esteem), lowering standards is also very tricky. In some ways, this second situation may be more interesting. And it seems unavoidable.

How can you prevent misunderstandings when people may not have the necessary background to understand what you’re saying?

This question may reveal a rather specific attitude: “it’s their fault if they don’t understand.” Such an attitude may even be widespread. Seems to me, it’s not rare to hear someone gloating about other people “getting it wrong,” with the suggestion that “we got it right.”  As part of negotiations surrounding expert status, such an attitude could even be a pretty rational approach. If you’re trying to position yourself as an expert and don’t suffer from an “impostor syndrome,” you can easily get the impression that non-specialists have it all wrong and that only experts like you can get to the truth. Yes, I’m being somewhat sarcastic and caricatural, here. Academics aren’t frequently that dismissive of other people’s difficulties understanding what seem like simple concepts. But, in the gap between academics and the general population a special type of intellectual snobbery can sometimes be found.

Obviously, I have a lot more to say about misunderstood academics. For instance, I wanted to address specific issues related to each of the links above. I also had pet peeves about widespread use of concepts and issues like “communities” and “Eskimo words for snow” about which I sometimes need to vent. And I originally wanted this post to be about “cultural awareness,” which ends up being a core aspect of my work. I even had what I might consider a “neat” bit about public opinion. Not to mention my whole discussion of academic obfuscation (remind me about “we-ness and distinction”).

But this is probably long enough and the timing is right for me to do something else.

I’ll end with an unverified anecdote that I like. This anecdote speaks to snobbery toward academics.

[It’s one of those anecdotes which was mentioned in a course I took a long time ago. Even if it’s completely fallacious, it’s still inspiring, like a tale, cautionary or otherwise.]

As the story goes (at least, what I remember of it), some ethnographers had been doing fieldwork  in an Australian cultural context and were focusing their research on a complex kinship system known in this context. Through collaboration with “key informants,” the ethnographers eventually succeeded in understanding some key aspects of this kinship system.

As should be expected, these kinship-focused ethnographers wrote accounts of this kinship system at the end of their field research and became known as specialists of this system.

After a while, the fieldworkers went back to the field and met with the same people who had described this kinship system during the initial field trip. Through these discussions with their “key informants,” the ethnographers end up hearing about a radically different kinship system from the one about which they had learnt, written, and taught.

The local informants then told the ethnographers: “We would have told you earlier about this but we didn’t think you were able to understand it.”

Confessions d'un papillon social

Tiens, tiens! C’est pas mal, ça… Ça fait plusieurs fois que j’utilise la formule «Confessions d’un {désignation personnelle}», par référence détournée à Rousseau. Amusant de voir que, cette fois-ci, le lien entre «promeneur solitaire» et «papillon social» est même orthographique… 😉

C’est aussi la première fois que je fais un billet aussi personnel. Quasi-introspectif. Et même pseudo-catholique.


Oui, je l’avoue, l’admet, le confesse et le proclame: j’aime les gens. Tout simplement. Tout court.

Pas «j’aime les gens qui me ressemblent». Pas «j’aime les gens de qualité». J’aime les gens. Tous. Les êtres humains. Les membres de mon espèce. Sans raison spécifique.

Ils font de tout, les gens, du plus vil au plus beau, du plus laid au plus louable. Mais ils sont surtout très intéressants, les gens.

Me sens «humaniste» dans un sens très précis: amoureux de la nature humaine. Me fait surtout traiter de «papillon social», y compris par mes proches. Quelqu’un qui passe d’une personne à l’autre comme un papillon qui butine de fleur en fleur. C’est surtout utilisé en anglais, mais des Francophones parlent aussi de papillonnage dans un sens assez proche.

C’est assez réaliste, comme désignation. J’eus toutefois tendance à prendre ça comme un reproche. Surtout quand certains observent ma tendance à passer d’une personne à l’autre lors de rencontres publiques. Ça rend “self-unconscious”. Après tout, il y a cette idée que le papillon social est un être fat, qu’il est motivé par un désir de gloire, qu’il n’est pas loyal… «Papillonnage» est même plus connoté et me ressemble moins puisqu’il touche à la promiscuité, qui n’a jamais été mon truc.

Donc, «papillon social», c’est pas une étiquette facile à porter. Mais désormais, je m’assume en tant que papillon social. Oui, j’en suis fier.

D’après moi, les papillons sociaux ont la possibilité d’avoir des effets intéressants, sur les gens et sur la société. Pas exactement un pouvoir d’influence. Mais plutôt le pouvoir d’un grain de sable dans l’engrenage. Les choses changent, les papillons sociaux participent au changement. Simplement en étant eux-mêmes. Les papillons sociaux ont aussi la possibilité d’unir les gens. Je me sens donc très confortable dans mon rôle de papillon social. Je ne suis pas sélectif dans mes amitiés mais j’accorde beaucoup d’importance à mes amis. Certains sont très proches de moi. D’autres sont plutôt des connaissances. Mais tous ont de l’importance pour moi.

Va pour le côté «social» de mon caractère social. Il y a une part plus intime.

M’allonge sur un divan modèle psychanalytique, tendance Freud et non Jung. Presque Woody Allen comme scène. Et les mots résonnent avec la force du lieu commun: «ça date de mon enfance».

Si si! De ma plus tendre enfance. Mes parents avaient de nombreux amis. Ma mère, surtout. Et ils m’ont emmené avec eux dans toutes sortes de soirées. Souvent, j’étais le seul enfant entouré de nombreux adultes. Parfois, j’étais le centre de l’attention. Toujours, j’avais du plaisir. Du moins, si mon souvenir est bon.

Faut comprendre la chose. Notre vie familiale a toujours été basée sur l’amitié. La maison de ma mère a souvent été le lieu de rencontres impromptues. Nous avions une terrasse sur laquelle nous passions de longues heures à bavarder, avec des amis. Parfois, nous chantions, nous accompagnant à la guitare. Souvent, nous réinventions le monde. Nos références étaient souvent européennes et francophones, étant donné notre lien avec la Suisse Romande et avec la France. Nous mangions, buvions, savourions la vie.

Il y avait un côté européen à la chose. Et mondain. Et intello. Par contre, rien de très bourgeois. Pas de notion d’exclusion. Beaucoup de franchise. Bref, comme une version post-hippie des salons proustiens.

J’avais six ans quand mes parents se sont séparés. C’était donc avec un seul parent à la fois que je découvrais les délices sociales de la «soirée entre amis».

Mais ma famille a toujours été unie. Surtout l’unité familiale formée par ma mère et ses trois fils. Puisque je suis l’enfant unique du deuxième mariage de ma mère, il y a de grandes différences «objectives» entre mes frères et moi. De plus, par diverses circonstances, nous avons souvent été géographiquement distants, les uns des autres. Mais nous avons toujours été unis par des liens filiaux très forts. D’une certaine façon, mes «demi-frères» sont encore plus réellement mes vrais frères que si j’avais été né du même père qu’eux. Leurs amis sont parfois devenus mes amis. Tout ça grâce à ma mère, dont je parle peu parce qu’elle est quasi-sacrée, pour moi. C’est elle qui a soutenu cette cellule familiale. Quiconque parle de familles mono-parentales de façon condescendante n’a pas vécu ce que nous avons vécu.

D’ailleurs, nous avons créé pour nous-mêmes une identité propre. Nous sommes les Enforaks. «En-» pour «Enkerli», le nom de mon père et mon propre nom de famille. Et «-fo-» pour «Thiffault», le nom du premier mari de ma mère et le nom de famille de mes frères. Étant, à l’époque, fan du dessin animé Goldorak, j’ai ajouté le pseudo-suffixe «-rak» au nom d’un robot en blocs Lego que j’avais construit. Pour moi, rien de comparable au noyau familial formé par Marielle Gagnon et ses fils: Christian Thiffault, Pierre Thiffault et Alexandre Enkerli. Les Enforaks, ce fut aussi plusieurs personnes qui ont gravité autour de nous. Si je me rappelle bien, c’est même pour manifester l’acceptation de Catherine Lapierre, celle qui allait devenir ma première belle-sœur, que j’ai bâti et nommé ma construction Lego. Il y eu plusieurs autres Enforaks, y compris une autre Catherine: ma tendre épouse, Catherine Léger.

Oui, je suis nostalgique.


J’ai autant de plaisir maintenant qu’à l’époque, à rencontrer des gens. Et je suis très content d’avoir la chance de converser avec des gens de divers horizons sociaux, culturels, géographiques, idéologiques et professionnels. C’est d’ailleurs plus facile pour moi d’être un papillon social dans l’ère digitale que ça ne l’a jamais été dans mon enfance.

Ma vie familiale et sociale à travers ma famille était surtout heureuse par opposition à ma vie scolaire. J’avais de bonnes notes, les profs m’appréciaient, j’avais l’occasion de développer diverses aptitudes. Mais j’avais énormément de difficulté à me faire des amis. Retour sur le fauteuil: je me suis toujours senti rejeté par mes contemporains. Traité de «maudit Français» à cause de mon accent semi-européen. Mis à l’écart dans le contexte des «sacrements» religieux, puisque contrairement à la quasi-totalité des élèves de mon école primaire, je n’avais jamais été baptisé. Seul «enfant du divorce» à mon école, j’étais une curiosité pour plusieurs, y compris certains membres du personnel. Pacifiste au milieu de bagarreurs, j’avais de la difficulté à me faire respecter. Écrivant «aussi mal qu’un médecin», j’étais la cible d’une attention très particulière. Peu séduisant, je n’avais aucun succès auprès des filles. Bavard, je fatiguais mes congénères. Mes aptitudes scolaires étant bien plus grandes que mes aptitudes sportives, j’avais tout pour me faire détester.

Bref, j’étais seul avec mon moi-même à moi tout seul. Ça te me forme un gars, ça, madame!

Faut dire que, même à la maison, j’étais souvent seul. Entre autres parce que ma mère travaillait à temps plein. Dès l’âge de 9 ans, j’ai commencé à cuisiner et à manger seul, tous les midis de semaine. Puis la maison était vide quand j’y retournais après une journée d’école. Mon frère Christian (qui avait dix-huit ans lors de mon entrée à l’école) ayant quitté la maison familiale assez tôt et mon frère Pierre étant mon ainé de huit ans, je n’avais pas de compagnon de jeu à portée de main. Je passais donc de longues heures seul, dans une immense chambre à coucher, à jouer ou à lire tout en réfléchissant.

Oh, j’ai bien eu des amis. Y compris Frédéric Fortin, avec qui je maintiens de très forts liens d’amitié. Mais j’étais, malgré tout, seul.

«J’écris pas pour me plaindre, j’avais juste le goût de parler

D’ailleurs, ce dont je me rends le plus compte, c’est que j’ai pu bénéficier de tout ça. Non seulement ma solitude m’a «fait les pieds» et je suis désormais heureux d’être seul, mais ça a contribué à me faire vivre des moments fort agréables qui se répètent souvent.

Ce qui a probablement changé le plus, depuis mon enfance, c’est que je n’ai plus le désir d’être populaire. Je veux voir les gens, discuter avec eux. Mais je ne tiens pas à ce qu’ils soient admiratifs à mon égard. Oh, bien évidemment, je veux être apprécié, comme tout le monde. Mais j’aime tout le monde et j’aime simplement rendre le monde heureux.

Le plus mieux de l’affaire, c’est que ça marche assez souvent. Quand on est heureux soi-même, c’est facile de rendre les autres heureux. Et quand on se sent bien dans sa peau, c’est facile d’être heureux soi-même. Et quand on aime les gens, c’est facile de se sentir bien dans sa peau. Et quand on apprend à connaître les gens, c’est facile de les aimer.